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Amblyopia (Lazy Eye)

Amblyopia, which is also called “lazy eye”, is a disorder that affects the visual development in children. Amblyopia is difficult to correct just with the use of contact lenses, or eyeglasses. Ambylopia can cause vision loss if it is not treated early and properly. This vision disorder affects 2-3% of the population.

What are the symptoms of Amblyopia?

Usually children that are born with amblyopia, the symptoms start in early childhood. Some signs of amblyopia in children are squinting, closing one eye in order to see better, poor general vision, headaches, and eyestrain. Usually caretakers such as parents, caregivers, doctors, or nurses notice these symptoms and recommend the child for treatment.

What are the causes of Amblyopia?

Strabismus is usually the cause of amblyopia. Strabismus is the eyes aligning incorrectly. Amblyopia can also be caused when there is a large difference between the eyes in refractive errors (prescription much higher in one eye than the other). For example, one eye is nearsighted, while the other is farsighted. If amblyopia is not treated, the brain will learn to disregard the vision in the eye with amblyopia. The eye that is disregarded does not grow with clear image and vision loss can be permanent. This is why it is very important to get early treatment and take your child to see your eye doctor if any signs are apparent.

How is Amblyopia treated?

There are several treatments for amblyopia, depending on the cause. Often children are treated using vision therapy, which usually includes a patch on the better eye. Other treatments are atropine eye drops, correct prescription eyeglasses, or surgery.

Vision Therapy

Vision therapy consists of eye exercises, which aim to teach the eyes to work together. In cases of amblyopia, the exercises require the brain to recognize the affected eye, which restores vision in that eye. Some doctors place a patch over the more functional eye, which forces the less functional eye to work harder and become stronger. The patch is generally worn for a few hours a day. Depending on the severity of the condition, treatment can last for weeks or months. Some children refuse to wear a patch, in those cases, a prosthetic contact lens is available. These contact lenses look like the regular eye, and are designed to block vision in that eye.

Atropine drops

Some doctors use atropine eye drops to treat amblyopia. These drops blur vision in the child’s better eye, forcing the weaker eye to work harder and get stronger. In the morning, one drop is instilled under eye doctor’s instructions. The advantage to this method of treatment is that the patch is avoided.

Prescription eyeglasses

If your child has developed amblyopia because of uncorrected vision, sometimes all that is needed is a pair of eyeglasses. When there is strong uncorrected prescription, or when there is a large difference in prescription between the two eyes, sometimes amblyopia can result. Your eye doctor may recommend eye patch therapy in addition to corrective lenses.

Surgery

Strabismus surgery is usually required if the amblyopia is due to a large eye turn. This type of surgery aligns the eyes and corrects the problem within the eye muscles. After the surgery the eyes will able to focus better. Additional vision therapy may be required after strabismus surgery.

Amblyopia must be treated as early as possible as there is no chance that it will resolve by itself. Untreated amblyopia can lead to permanent vision loss in that eye and reduced depth perception. Amblyopia needs to be treated promptly so that your child can have the best vision possible in childhood and later in life. When amblyopia is diagnosed and treated before age 9, the weaker eye can often develop significantly better vision. The most critical time to treat amblyopia is from 3 to 6 years of age. If you or anyone sees any signs of amblyopia, go to your eye doctor to find the best treatment for your child.

January 10, 2022

To All Our Established Patients,

The office of Dr. Michael J. Morris has enjoyed serving patients at our Hillview (approximately 15 years) and Shepherdsville (approximately 5 years) office locations. Due to staffing shortages and other challenges related to the pandemic, the decision has been made to cease seeing patients at these two locations effective January 15, 2022. I will start seeing established patients and new patients starting January 17, 2022 at Visionworks Doctors of Optometry, located at 4655 Outer Loop, Louisville, KY 40129). This practice is between the Red Lobster and  McAlister's Deli on OuterLoop (going toward the Jefferson Mall). I will see patients there on Mondays, Fridays, and Saturdays. I look forward to continuing to serve your eye care needs at this location.  The office number to the new location is (502) 966-2020. When calling for an appointment, please request me by name and the staff will ensure that I see you at your appointment time. In addition, the office telephone number you have contacted me at previously (502) 968-2720 will still be active for leaving messages and requesting glasses or contact lens prescription or any other information in your file. The messages will be checked daily, please allow additional time to return your calls during this time of transition.

Sincerely,

Dr. Michael J. Morris, OD

To Book Appointment with Dr. Michael J. Morris, OD, Please contact the new location at

(502)966-2020 

https://locations.visionworks.com/ll/US/KY/Louisville/4655-Outer-Loop

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Dr. Michael J. Morris, OD has moved to: Visionworks Doctors of Optometry Located at 4655 Outer Loop, Louisville, KY 40129

To Book Appointment with Dr. Michael J. Morris, OD, please contact the new location at (502)966-2020 https://locations.visionworks.com/ll/US/KY/Louisville/4655-Outer-Loop